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Therapy And Wellness News

Your weight as a teenager is linked to your risk of heart failure in early mid...
Research that followed more than 1.6 million Swedish men from adolescence onwards between 1968 and 2005 has shown that those who were overweight as teenagers were more likely to develop heart failure in early middle age. Surprisingly, the increased risk of heart failure was found in men who were within the normal body weight range a body mass index of 18.5 to 25 in adolescence, with an increased risk starting in those with a BMI of 20 and rising steeply to ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Jun 17
Carrots and sticks fail to change behaviour in cocaine addiction
People who are addicted to cocaine are particularly prone to developing habits that render their behaviour resistant to change, regardless of the potentially devastating consequences, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. The findings may have important implications for the treatment of cocaine addiction as they help explain why such individuals take drugs even when they are aware of the negative consequences, and why they find their beha ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Jun 17
E-cigarettes: Gateway or roadblock to cigarette smoking?
Warsaw, Poland, 17 June 2016 - A new study from the UK Centre for Substance Use Research, being presented today at the Global Forum on Nicotine, shows e-cigarettes are playing an important role in reducing the likelihood of young people smoking, in many cases acting as a roadblock to combustible tobacco. In detailed qualitative interviews with young people aged 16 to 25 across Scotland and England, the majority of participants viewed e-cigarettes as having ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Jun 17
New Research From Psychological Science
Read about the latest research published in Psychological Science Pupillary Contagion in Infancy Evidence for Spontaneous Transfer of Arousal Christine Fawcett, Victoria Wesevich, and Gustaf Gredeb ck Pupillary contagion 8212 when an individual 8217 s pupil size influences the pupil size of an observer 8212 is thought to be an automatic mechanism that facilitates prosocial responding and group cohesion. To explore whether the phenomenon might exist early i ...
Psychological Science - Fri. Jun 17
10 Stress-Busting Strategies for Parents
I m stressed, we re rushing, and before I know it, I m yelling. When I see the look on his face, I feel awful. He was just being a kid. And I was just stressed out. Dana
Psychology Today - Thu. Jun 16
Can You "Catch" Depression?
Is depression contagious The short answer is yes. But like most things, the answer is complicated. It s not as if you ll get infected when your depressed friend cries on your shoulder. Instead, your own susceptibility or immunity depends on lots of things, from your genetics to your history and stress levels. It s been known for almost a decade that both healthy and unhealthy behaviors are contagious if your friends quit smoking or become obese, you re mor ...
Psychology Today - Thu. Jun 16
The Fundamental Question About Trump: What's Wrong With This Guy?
Republicans facing a near-daily grilling about Donald Trump rsquo s views on Muslims, a giant border wall with Mexico or a possible trade war with China should probably start prepping for a more fundamental question ldquo What rsquo s wrong with this guy rdquo
Huffington Post - Thu. Jun 16
Absent investments, 200 million children may not reach their potential: Experts
Thirty-one academic experts in children s health argue that absent urgent action by international aid agencies, 200 million children around the world could sustain serious, lifelong cognitive impairment. The National Academy of Medicine Perspective article makes the case that global policy lags behind the science of brain health, and children must be given the opportunity not just to survive, but thrive. Neil Boothby, the Allan Rosenfield Professor at Colu ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Jun 16
Women's long work hours linked to alarming increases in cancer, heart disease
COLUMBUS, Ohio - Women who put in long hours for the bulk of their careers may pay a steep price life-threatening illnesses, including heart disease and cancer. Work weeks that averaged 60 hours or more over three decades appear to triple the risk of diabetes, cancer, heart trouble and arthritis for women, according to new research from The Ohio State University. The risk begins to climb when women put in more than 40 hours and takes a decidedly bad turn a ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Jun 16
7-day doctors cut weekend emergency hospital visits by 18 percent, study finds
The UK Government s pilot of seven-day opening of doctor surgeries has significantly reduced weekend emergency hospital visits, hospital admissions and ambulance call-outs, new University of Sussex research has found. Spread across the whole week, Accident Emergency visits were down 10 per cent among patients of pilot surgeries in central London. The greatest effect was seen on Saturdays and Sundays, with a drop of 18 per cent recorded across weekends. Cru ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Jun 16
Stem cell transplant from young to old can heal stomach ulcers
Bethesda, MD June 16, 2016 -- Basic and translational research paves the way for breakthroughs that can ultimately change patient care. Three new studies from Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology CMGH -- AGA s basic and translational open-access journal -- provide a glimpse into future treatment strategies for stomach ulcers, inflammatory bowel disease and alcoholic liver disease. Please find summaries below. To speak with the journal aut ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Jun 16
Otherfathering and Men in Polyamorous Families
Conventional Masculinity Constricting In the last 50 years, women s social choices have expanded dramatically. Men s choices, in sharp contrast, have barely budged, and the confines of what scholars call hegemonic masculinity remain suffocatingly small. Women can work for pay, serve in military combat, and lead a range of religious services because they have doggedly sought entrance to what used to be men s world of professional, financial, and legal statu ...
Psychology Today - Wed. Jun 15
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